SEARCH
 

TOP

License Renewals

Frequently Asked Questions for Administrators

This page is a work in progress. As we receive more questions from administrators we will add answers to this webpage. Check back often!

1. When I sign a Utah Educator License Renewal form, what am I verifying?

2. If a renewal is audited that I signed, what does that mean to me?

3. Do I need to maintain any documentation of the renewals I sign off on?

4. What type of documentation should I expect to see?

5. An inactive educator contacted me about setting up an appointment to meet about their licensure, what do they need?

6. When I sign a Professional Learning Plan form for an educator, what am I verifying?

7. A different administrator signed off on a Professional Learning Plan that contained a professional learning activity that I don’t feel is appropriate, do I have to sign off on the renewal?

8. Why did the Utah State Board of Education add in this new Professional Learning Plan requirement?

9. I think the educator should get some credit for a particular activity but it doesn’t seem to fit in any of the categories of acceptable renewal activities; what do I do?

10. An educator presented me with a license renewal form that did not have sufficient points, do I sign the form to verify what they do have?

11. Are Continuing Education Units (CEUs) worth points toward license renewal?

 


1. When I sign a Utah Educator License Renewal form, what am I verifying?
First and foremost, you are verifying that the license holder has completed the activities listed for license renewal points on page 2 of the renewal form and that the individual has enough points to renew the license. This means that you have reviewed documentation for each activity and are satisfied that the educator did indeed complete the listed activities. Additionally, you are verifying that you understand the Utah License Renewal Rules (R277-500) and that the completed activities are in compliance with those rules.

TOP | NEXT

 

2. If a renewal is audited that I signed, what does that mean to me?
Under normal circumstances, at most it would mean a phone call from USOE asking if you recall signing off on the audited renewal. Our regular random audits only review the signed form. We do not normally ask for renewal activity documentation unless we are auditing for cause which is quite rare. If you approved an activity that may not be in compliance with the Utah License Renewal Rules, we may call you for clarification, but a referral to the Utah Professional Practices Advisory Committee would be very unlikely unless the activity was blatantly out of compliance with those rules.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

3. Do I need to maintain any documentation of the renewals I sign off on?
No. You may want to keep track of the names of any inactive educators that you sign-off on, but the licensed educator is the one responsible for maintaining all documentation of the renewal.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

4. What type of documentation should I expect to see?
The type of documentation depends on the renewal activity. For university or USOE credit you would want original transcripts (official, but not sealed) or a print-out from OnTrack. For conferences or workshops you should expect a certificate of completion (listing the individual's name) or a conference agenda accompanied by evidence of registration. For paraprofessional, substitute teaching, or volunteer work that was not completed at your school you should expect a letter on school or district letterhead signed by an administrator. In general, your signature is indicating that you are verifying that the activity was completed and therefore, the documentation should be sufficient that you are comfortable signing.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

5. An inactive educator contacted me about setting up an appointment to meet about their licensure, what do they need?
One of two things, either the educator needs to have their renewal form signed or they need to have their Professional Learning Plan signed. The educator should have all their documentation gathered and ready to present to you prior to the meeting. If the educator has questions about the licensing process, they should review this website or contact USOE. School administrators are not required to provide this service to inactive educators. However, USOE believes that if school administrators are willing to take a little time to work with inactive educators in their community, it will benefit education as a whole. License holders are counseled to be mindful of the busy schedules of administrators and to work around your schedule.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

6. When I sign a Professional Learning Plan form for an educator, what am I verifying?
First, remember that for active educators the Professional Learning Plan is a small part of the educator's overall Professional Growth Plan that is a part of the new educator evaluation system. You will want to contact your district or charter school director for details. 

For inactive educators, your signature indicates that you have met with the individual and reviewed the list of activities they plan to complete. It also indicates that the listed activities are in compliance with the Utah License Renewal Rules (R277-500) and that you feel they are appropriate for the individual. The plan may include an educator self-assessment in relation to the Utah Effective Teaching Standards. As you are not in a position to have evaluated the educator, your signature is not related to any such self-assessment.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

7. A different administrator signed off on a Professional Learning Plan that contained a professional learning activity that I don’t feel is appropriate, do I have to sign off on the renewal?
No. Ultimately, when signing a renewal form, you must be comfortable that the activities are in compliance with the Utah License Renewal Rules. If you are not comfortable with a particular activity, you should not sign off on it. If the educator still has sufficient renewal points without that particular activity, you may wish to sign a revised renewal form that does not list that particular activity.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

8. Why did the Utah State Board of Education add in this new Professional Learning Plan requirement?
The Professional Learning Plan requirement is intended to assist educators in planning ahead for their license renewal. Too often, under the old rule, educators were scrambling at the end of a license cycle to find things to complete for license renewal. While this is not a perfect solution, we feel that this requirement is a step towards educators taking greater responsibility for their professional licensure.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

9. I think the educator should get some credit for a particular activity but it doesn’t seem to fit in any of the categories of acceptable renewal activities. What do I do?
There is an acceptable alternative professional learning activities category. These types of activities are worth 1 point per clock hour, not to exceed 25 points per activity. When approving activities in this category, we advise that you ask yourself if you would feel comfortable justifying the approval of this activity to another administrator.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

10. An educator presented me with a license renewal form that did not have sufficient points, do I sign the form to verify what they do have?
No. You should only sign the form if the educator has enough points to renew the license. Level 1 licenses require 100 point to renew. Level 2 and level 3 licenses require 200 points to renew.

TOP | NEXT | PREVIOUS

 

11. Are Continuing Education Units (CEUs) worth points toward license renewal?
A CEU is typically awarded for completion of continuing education requirements mandated by various certification bodies (i.e. nurses, architects…). If the licensed administrator believes that the activity was related to the educator’s license area(s) and endorsement then they can be approved under category E. Points should be awarded based on the number of hours in the activity, but if this is not readily available, 1 CEU is generally defined as 10 hours and therefore worth 10 points. Remember that category E limits any 1 activity to a maximum of 25 points.

TOP | PREVIOUS